PBPK modelling

/Tag:PBPK modelling

A Quantitative Structure-toxicokinetic Relationship Model for Highly Metabolised Chemicals

Patrick Poulin and Kannan Krishnan

The aim of the present study was to develop a quantitative structure-toxicokinetic relationship (QSTkR) model for highly metabolised chemicals (HMCs). The proposed QSTkR model is essentially a physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model, in which the blood:air and tissue:blood partition coefficients (PCs) are predicted from the molecular structure of chemicals, and the liver blood flow rate (Ql) is used to describe hepatic clearance. Molecular structure-based prediction of the blood:air and tissue:blood PCs was performed from the n-octanol:water and water:air PCs of chemicals obtained with the conventional fragment constant methods. The validity of incorporating Ql instead of metabolic rate constants, as the hepatic clearance factor, in PBTK models for HMCs (extraction ratio > 0.7) was verified by comparing the simulations of venous blood concentration (Cv) profiles obtained with both the QSTkR and PBTK model approaches for 1,1-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene and furan in the rat. Following the validation of this alternative approach for describing hepatic clearance of HMCs, a QSTkR model for dichloromethane was constructed. This model used molecular structure information as the sole input, and provided simulations of Cv for human exposure to low concentrations of dichloromethane. The QSTkR model simulations were similar to those obtained with the previously validated, conventional human PBTK model with experimentally determined PCs and metabolic rate constants (Vmax, Km and Kf) for dichloromethane. The present methodology is the first validated example of a mechanistically based prediction of the inhalation toxicokinetics of HMCs made solely from information on molecular structure.
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Integrated Decision-tree Testing Strategies for Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity with Respect to the Requirements of the EU REACH Legislation

Robert Combes, Christina Grindon, Mark T.D. Cronin, David W. Roberts and John F. Garrod

Liverpool John Moores University and FRAME recently conducted a research project sponsored by Defra, on the status of alternatives to animal testing with regard to the European Union REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) system for the safety testing and risk assessment of chemicals. The project covered all the main toxicity endpoints associated with the REACH system. This paper focuses on the prospects for using alternative methods (both in vitro and in silico) for mutagenicity (genotoxicity) and carcinogenicity testing — two toxicity endpoints, which, together with reproductive toxicity, are of pivotal importance for the REACH system. The manuscript critically discusses well-established testing approaches, and in particular, the requirement for short-term in vivo tests for confirming positive mutagenicity, and the need for the rodent bioassay for detecting non-genotoxic carcinogens. Recently-proposed testing strategies focusing on non-animal approaches are also considered, and our own testing scheme is presented and supported with background information. This scheme makes maximum use of pre-existing data, computer (in silico) and in vitro methods, with weight-of-evidence assessments at each major stage. The need for the improvement of in vitro methods, to reduce the generation of false-positive results, is also discussed. Lastly, ways in which reduction and refinement measures can be used are also considered, and some recommendations are made for future research to facilitate the implementation of the proposed testing scheme.
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Proposed Integrated Decision-tree Testing Strategies for Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity in Relation to the EU REACH Legislation

Robert Combes, Christina Grindon, Mark T.D. Cronin, David W. Roberts and John Garrod

Liverpool John Moores University and FRAME recently conducted a research project sponsored by Defra, on the status of alternatives to animal testing with regard to the European Union REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) system for the safety testing and risk assessment of chemicals. The project covered all the main toxicity endpoints associated with the REACH system. This paper focuses on the prospects for using alternative methods (both in vitro and in silico) for mutagenicity (genotoxicity) and carcinogenicity testing — two toxicity endpoints, which, together with reproductive toxicity, are of pivotal importance for the REACH system. The manuscript critically discusses well-established testing approaches, and in particular, the requirement for short-term in vivo tests for confirming positive mutagenicity, and the need for the rodent bioassay for detecting non-genotoxic carcinogens. Recently-proposed testing strategies focusing on non-animal approaches are also considered, and our own testing scheme is presented and supported with background information. This scheme makes maximum use of pre-existing data, computer (in silico) and in vitro methods, with weight-of-evidence assessments at each major stage. The need for the improvement of in vitro methods, to reduce the generation of false-positive results, is also discussed. Lastly, ways in which reduction and refinement measures can be used are also considered, and some recommendations are made for future research to facilitate the implementation of the proposed testing scheme.
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