hepatocytes

/Tag:hepatocytes

A Normal and Biotransforming Model of the Human Bronchial Epithelium for the Toxicity Testing of Aerosols and Solubilised Substances

Zoë C. Prytherch and Kelly A. BéruBé

In this article, we provide an overview of the experimental workflow by the Lung and Particle Research Group at Cardiff University, that led to the development of the two in vitro lung models — the normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) model and the lung–liver model, Metabo-Lung™. This work was jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. The NHBE model is a three-dimensional, in vitro, human tissue-based model of the normal human bronchial epithelium, and Metabo-Lung involves the co-culture of the NHBE model with primary human hepatocytes, thus permitting the biotransformation of inhaled toxicants in an in vivo-like manner. Both models can be used as alternative test systems that could replace the use of animals in research and development for safety and toxicity testing in a variety of industries (e.g. the pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetics, and food industries). Metabo-Lung itself is a unique tool for the in vitro detection of toxins produced by reactive metabolites. This 21st century animal replacement model could yield representative in vitro predictions for in vivo toxicity. This advancement in in vitro toxicology relies on filter-well technology that will enable a wide-spectrum of researchers to create viable and economic alternatives for respiratory safety assessment and disease-focused research.
You need to register (for free) to download this article. Please log in/register here.

A Comparison of Hepatic Enzyme Activities and their Modulation by Dexamethazone in Freshly Isolated and Cultured Hepatocytes and in the Differentiated Hepatoma Cell Line, 2sFou

Michael J. Garlel

You need to register (for free) to download this article. Please log in/register here.

Lack of Effect of Medium Supplementation With Pyruvate and Hormones on Cytochrome P450-mediated Activity of Rat Hepatocytes in Primary Culture

Porntip Wirachwong and Jeffrey R. Fry

The loss of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent activity continues to be a problem in the use of cultured hepatocytes in xenobiotic toxicity studies. It has been reported that the inclusion of pyruvate and various hormones in the culture medium improves the maintenance of various hepatic functions, including that of CYP2C11 mRNA expression. We have studied this further, by investigating the effects of the addition of pyruvate and hormones on various CYP-dependent enzyme activities and on the CYP-dependent toxicity of precocene II in rat hepatocyte cultures. No beneficial effects of this medium supplementation could be demonstrated.
You need to register (for free) to download this article. Please log in/register here.