attitudes

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Stakeholder Views on the Creation and Use of Genetically-Engineered Animals in Research

Elisabeth H. Ormandy

This interview-based study examined the diversity of views relating to the creation and use of genetically-engineered (GE) animals in biomedical science. Twenty Canadian participants (eight researchers, five research technicians and seven members of the public) took part in the interviews, in which four main themes were discussed: a) how participants felt about the genetic engineering of animals as a practice; b) governance of the creation and use of GE animals in research, and whether current guidelines are sufficient; c) the Three Rs (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) and how they are applied during the creation and use of GE animals in research; and d) whether public opinion should play a greater role in the creation and use of GE animals. Most of the participants felt that the creation and use of GE animals for biomedical research purposes (as opposed to food purposes) is acceptable, provided that tangible human health benefits are gained. However, obstacles to Three Rs implementation were identified, and the participants agreed that more effort should be placed on engaging the public on the use of GE animals in research.

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Attitudes in China Toward the Use of Animals in Laboratory Research

Gareth Davey and Zhihui Wu

Public support is a strong impetus for the adoption of alternatives to laboratory animals. It is therefore important to find out what a society thinks about ethical animal use. In the case of China, a useful line of enquiry was to survey Chinese people’s views, as their country is renowned for the deplorable conditions under which animals are kept. This report concerns an investigation into the attitudes of Chinese university students toward the use of animals in laboratory research. The survey revealed a moderate concern amongst students; for example, they agreed that the use of animals for testing cosmetics and household products is unnecessary and should be stopped, and disagreed that humans have the right to use animals as they see fit. This finding is very encouraging. Further research is needed, in order to understand Chinese views about the justification of using animals in research.
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2017-01-09T06:37:16+00:00 Tags: , , , |

Willingness to Spare Animals in Undergraduate Medical Education in Southern India: A Preliminary Questionnaire Questionnairebased

Shehnaz

Animal experiments continue to play an integral role in Indian undergraduate medical education, even though alternatives are becoming increasingly available. In this context, this study aimed to assess the perceptions of pharmacology faculty members from medical colleges in southern India regarding the use of animals and alternatives in experimental pharmacology, and to determine the association between these perceptions and the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants. Data were collected from 59 faculty members of 15 medical colleges in southern India. The response rate was 84.3%. A 30-statement, five-domain questionnaire was used, with a global score of 120. The mean ± SD global score was 60.9 ± 17.3. Significant differences were observed in domain scores and individual statement scores with respect to the extent of teaching experience. There were no statistically significant differences in perceptions with respect to age, gender or educational qualifications. All the participating colleges were conducting at least 3–8 animal experiments per year on the rabbit, rat, mouse and frog/toad. The pharmacology faculty members in the southern India medical colleges included in the study (especially the more experienced teachers) supported animal use in undergraduate medical education, in spite of being aware of the drawbacks of animal experiments and the availability of alternatives.
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Do Faculty in Southern Indian Medical Colleges Support Animal Use in Postgraduate Education More Than in Undergraduate Education?

Syed Ilyas Shehnaz, Jayadevan Sreedharan, Mohamed Arifulla and Kadayam Guruswami Gomathi

In India, animal experiments play an integral role in both undergraduate medical education (UGME) and postgraduate medical education (PGME) in the discipline of Pharmacology. Therefore, we aimed to compare the perceptions of pharmacology faculty members in southern India with regard to the use of animal experiments and alternatives in UGME and in PGME. We also determined the association between these perceptions and the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants. Pharmacology faculty members in 15 medical colleges located in southern India answered a 27-statement, 5-domain questionnaire with a total score of 108. The means of the total, domain and statement scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean total score obtained for faculty members (n = 52) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) for PGME (61.2/108) than that for UGME (51.9/108). Significant differences were observed in the mean total and in the domain scores for PGME when compared to UGME in all of the socio-demographic groups, except for male faculty members and those without an MD or doctoral degree. The mean individual statement scores also indicated that there is more support for animal use in PGME. Overall, it was apparent that pharmacology faculty members in southern Indian medical colleges support animal use in PGME more than in UGME. Increased awareness is required among faculty members concerning alternatives to animal experiments in medical education, especially in PGME. [/fusion_toggle] [/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column row_column_index="1_2" type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][s2If current_user_cannot(access_s2member_level3)] [_s2If current_user_can(access_s2member_ccap_400303)] [fusion_button link="http://www.atla.org.uk/?s2member_file_download=access-s2member-ccap-400303/40-3_Shehnaz_.pdf" color="default" size="small" target="_self" title="Download" animation_type="0" animation_direction="down" animation_speed="0.1"]Download this article[/fusion_button] [/_s2If] [_s2If current_user_cannot(access_s2member_ccap_400303)] This article is currently only available in full to paid subscribers. Click here to subscribe, or you will need to log in/register to buy and download this article [/_s2If] [/s2If]